Like Disneyland for Adults: The Golden Tiki – Las Vegas

The Golden Tiki sign

With its rum-spiked Dole Whip and profanity-spouting animatronic skeleton, The Golden Tiki in Las Vegas is like Disneyland designed for adults. It’s even sprinkled with tributes to (and/or props from) Walt Disney’s Enchanted Tiki Room, Indiana Jones, Jungle Cruise, Pirates of the Caribbean and Haunted Mansion.

Bar

The driving force behind this tiki bar, which opened in August 2015, was Vegas marketing and nightlife impresario Branden Powers. (Back in the ’90s in San Diego, he spun exotica tunes for weekly events at the Hanalei Hotel’s Islands Restaurant, before it was gutted.)

The Golden Tiki is sandwiched in a seemingly endless strip mall called The Center at Spring Mountain in Chinatown, which is only a couple miles west of The Strip.

Outpost near entrance

The fantastic décor was masterminded by Tiki Diablo, whose previous projects include the Tonga Hut Palm Springs (and its secret tiki room) and Mission Tiki Drive-in Theater in Montclair. Billy the Crud devoted half a year to making masks, carvings and more for the bar.

After entering through a lava rock cave serenaded by the familiar refrain of “Yo ho, yo ho, a pirates life for me,” you’ll find yourself next to a trading outpost (future souvenir stand) stocked with curiosities like The Chachapoyan Fertility Idol.

Headhunters Village

The design incorporates the legend of the Golden Tiki, which you can read on the back of the menu (or on the website). It’s the story of Captain William Tobias Faulkner, who flees from vengeful pirates and lands on Skull Island, reputedly populated by Cyclops who melted down treasure in a volcano to make the Golden Tiki. His crew is attacked by inhospitable natives, as represented by the “Headhunter Village” on the left. Three booths, each able to sit at least six, are adorned with skulls, spears and other weapons, as well as masks from Oceanic Arts, the famed tropical warehouse in Southern California.

Along the wall is a shell waterfall reminiscent of the one from the aforementioned Hanalei Hotel. Meanwhile, the backs of the bar chairs feature Bosko carvings that correspond to each area’s theme (skulls, cyclops or seahorses).

Golden Tiki interior

If you walk straight in instead, you’ll find tall tables along the wall below A-frames and custom black velvet paintings that also illustrate this backstory. Behind the bar is a large thatched hut with a tiki drummer from the Enchanted Tiki Room perched on top. You’ll also notice the illuminated face of “Goldy,” an animated special effect contributed by “Irk” Hedman. A faux night sky stretches over all this space with twinkling LED stars and bursts of fireworks.

(I hear there used to be TVs behind the bar, so I was happy to see that they’ve since been cleverly concealed…though there is still one remaining screen on the rear wall next to the DJ booth.)

Mermaid's Cove

The tale continues with the Captain being saved by seductive sirens. “Mermaid Cove” is portrayed by this giant pink clamshell bathed in a fluid lighting effect to illustrate the “Diamond Falls” (where Faulkner discovers and steals the Golden Tiki). It’s a popular spot to pose for photos, so I had to continue the tradition.

This corner has a small raised platform where live bands occasionally perform. (The Golden Tiki has been open for less than a year, but they are already looking to expand into the space next door to create the “Cyclops Burial Ground” and a larger stage.)

Skeleton

Finally, you’ll reach the “Pirate’s Lair.” Moored in the middle of the room is a ship with the skeleton of Faulkner, who wasted away gazing in wonder at the Golden Tiki. Periodically, he comes to life and regales those seated on the surrounding banquettes. (I guess dead men do tell tales…)

Adjacent to this room is the hall of curiosity (also the corridor to the restrooms). It’s worth a wander even if you’re not in need of the facilities.

Dole Whip with rum

Dole Whip, that frosty pineapple treat people line up for at the Enchanted Tiki Room, can be ordered on its own for $6, as a float with pineapple juice for $9 or with Coruba dark rum for $11.

Banana Batida, Painkiller, Golden Tiki

Dole Whip even makes its way into some of the drinks, like the Banana Batida (left) and The Painkiller (middle), where it stands in for the pineapple juice. Aside from that, they stay faithful to the recipe for this litigious libation with Pusser’s Rum, coconut cream, orange and grated nutmeg on top.

The other cocktails range from tiki classics (Mai Tai, Navy Grog, Three Dots and a Dash, Jungle Bird) to original creations that incorporate Asian flavors like lemongrass and Thai basil. For example, the signature Golden Tiki features five spice syrup along with Jamaican rum, Michter’s rye, apricot liqueur, ginger and mango.

Drinks

Of the drinks we sampled, my favorites were probably the Painkiller and the Kokonut Sunrise (left), made with tequila, mezcal, honey syrup, pineapple and homemade grenadine. If you prefer something that’s not as sweet, the Hotel Nacional (middle) may be up your alley. The Honey Mango Java Punch (right) is interesting, though I’m not a huge fan of bringing coffee liqueur into the mix.

Most of the cocktails are priced at $11, but there also are a few bowls (Scorpion and Zombie Punch), Martinique Ti’ Punch prepared tableside from a cart, and the $500 Treasure Chest that comes with a bottle of Veuve Clicquot Champagne and Appleton Estate 12 Year Jamaican Rum (the tiki equivalent of bottle service, I suppose).

Menu

Tiki Farm mugs are available for purchase for $29 (including the drink), but the ones pictured on the menu have since sold out. Instead, they offer some of the other recently released designs, like the Marqo-Coco and Lightning.

Upcoming mugs for The Golden Tiki

However, The Golden Tiki is working on some unique signature designs for mugs, including one featuring Tiki Diablo’s sculpt of the logo tiki from Doug Horne’s menu cover art, as well as a Cyclops sipper from Tom Thordarson (aka Thor). The former should be available in March.

The Golden Tiki

In true Las Vegas style, The Golden Tiki is open 24 hours (same as Frankie’s Tiki Room, the other must-visit tiki bar in town). Food isn’t served here except during happy hour (Monday through Friday 2 p.m.-6 p.m.) when there is a free mini-buffet of Chinese food (chicken wings, egg rolls, potstickers), plus $5 Mai Tais and $1 off all drinks. (The drink specials are also available weeknights from 4 a.m.-8 a.m.)

Check out their Facebook page for a heads up on DJs (cover charges sometimes apply after 8 p.m.), live music, burlesque shows, etc.

The Golden Tiki
3939 Spring Mountain Rd.
Las Vegas, NV 89102
702-222-3196

Underwater Artistry: Mermaid Shows at the Wreck Bar – Fort Lauderdale, FL

B Ocean Resort (formerly Yankee Clipper)

We have all been led to believe that mermaids are just mythical creatures, but you may be convinced otherwise with a weekend visit to the Wreck Bar at B Ocean Resort (formerly Sheraton Fort Lauderdale Beach Hotel). It originally opened in the 1950s as the Yankee Clipper, hence the ship-shaped architecture.

The Wreck Bar, one of the few porthole lounges left in America

The Wreck Bar, which was built to look like a sunken Spanish galleon, is one of the few porthole lounges left in America. Behind the bar are windows that display an underwater view of the hotel’s pool. In the past decade, the property has undergone changes in ownership and multi-million-dollar renovations, but the Wreck Bar has managed to stay relatively intact.

A full house for the mermaid show at The Wreck Bar

The space is small — and the mermaids quite popular — so you better get there early. When we visited a few years ago, we arrived 45 minutes early and the room was already half full, with all extra available space filled in with white folding chairs. (There were lots of families in the crowd, and it is a bit strange to see a bunch of kids in a bar.)

The Wreck Bar in Fort Lauderdale

We were initially tempted by the banquettes and tables along the back wall of aquariums. Instead, we snagged a few of the bar stools for front-row views of the show. That’s definitely the way to go unless you have a larger group. (Also, you can admire the wooden bar rail with all the carvings inscribed by patrons over the years. Legend has it that Joe DiMaggio etched his and Marilyn Monroe’s initials, and the owner of the hotel removed that chunk as a souvenir.)

Stained glass mermaid at The Wreck Bar

There’s a lovely stained glass mermaid mural, plus neat little details like gold doubloon-type coins inlaid in the tables. Looking up, you’ll notice jagged cut-outs in the wood plank ceiling to reinforce the shipwreck setting.

The Wreck Bar in Analyze This

The Wreck Bar has been featured on the silver screen in the 1960 spring break flick “Where the Boys Are,” and more recently in “Analyze This” (1999). A plaque on the wall commemorates the scene with Robert DeNiro and Billy Crystal.

Mai Tide poster by Tom Thordarson

You may also spot a poster of “Mai Tide,” a painting by Tom Thordarson (aka Thor) featuring the queen bee of the deep blue sea: Marina the Fire-Eating Mermaid (aka MeduSirena). (She’s been a muse for many artists and even inspired a comic book character.)

Black Pearl at The Wreck Bar

While you wait for the show to start, you can take the opportunity to order some grog and/or grub. (Pictured is the “Black Pearl,” which used to be a signature drink. You should probably save your serious imbibing for the nearby Mai-Kai, my favorite tiki bar in the world.) The revamped food menu ranges from avocado hummus, sweet soy ginger wings and corn, lobster and crab cakes to chimichurri rib-eye, mahi mahi and jerk guava bbq chicken.

Marina the Fire-Eating Mermaid

Marina is a famous finned figure on the tiki scene. The Wreck Bar hadn’t regularly hosted mermaid shows since 1962, but she revived this wonderful retro entertainment here and it’s been a success for nearly a decade. She’s also appeared at events like Tiki Oasis in San Diego, Tiki Kon in Portland and The Hukilau in Fort Lauderdale. (And if you’re ever in Macau, you can see her digitally projected at the City of Dreams’ Vquarium.) I’d caught her performance at Vintage Roadside’s mermaid event at Modernism Week in Palm Springs, but there’s nothing like seeing her in her natural habitat.

Mermaid show at the Wreck Bar

She and the “Aquaticats” she’s trained put on a mesmerizing show, demonstrating such control of movement underwater in their graceful gliding and flips, all the while interacting with the audience via mysterious gazes and flirtatious looks. After the show, guests can go upstairs to the pool level and pose for photos with them.

Mermaids in Fort Lauderdale

Around Halloween, the Creature from the Black Lagoon has been known to crash the pool party, while Christmas might feature a siren in a Santa suit. There are also special themed shows scheduled during The Hukilau (June 8-12).

Side of the Wreck Bar

The Wreck Bar opens at 5:30 p.m. and MeduSirena’s 30-minute swimshow takes place at 6:30 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays. Parking is available for $10 in a garage across the street. (Then, access the hotel via the covered walkway on the fourth level, take the second set of elevators down to the lobby and head left to the Wreck Bar.)

Want to know where else you can find cocktails and fishtails? Travel + Leisure recently published an article on the “10 Places for Mermaid Spotting in America.”

UPDATE! Some recent news from The Wreck Bar: “The Wreck Bar will soon be nearly twice its size, with two additional portholes restored. The cocktail & food menu is now better than ever! (No more plastic cups!) Bartender Mark is “Raising the Bar!” We are also looking into later night shows for 21+ only.”

The Wreck Bar
B Ocean Resort
1140 Seabreeze Blvd.
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33316
954-564-1000

Germany Tiki Tour, Part 3: Trader Vic’s Munich

Trader Vic's entrance

Our little tiki tour of Germany started in Nuremberg with Kon Tiki and Die Blume von Hawaii, and concluded a little farther south into Bavaria with Trader Vic’s Munich. During the 1950s, ’60s and ’70s, “Trader Vic” Bergeron ramped up the expansion of his eponymous Polynesian-themed restaurants. However, of the more than 20 locations from its mid-century heyday, only a handful of those original establishments are still around today. Trader Vic’s London, which opened in 1963, is the oldest operating branch, followed by Trader Vic’s Munich, which made its debut in 1971.

Inside entrance

This is the only Trader Vic’s location left in Germany (or continental Europe, for that matter), since the closures of Trader Vic’s Berlin (2003-2009) and Trader Vic’s Hamburg (1990-2013). The restaurant is located in the basement of the Bayerischer Hof, an historic hotel that’s a favorite of politicians and celebrities. To the right of the main hotel doors is a blue awning underneath which a Marquesan tiki stands sentry.

Stairway

This entrance leads straight to the staircase descending into this subterranean tiki retreat. It’s flanked by carved tiki poles and decorative metal tiles. (If we’re drawing comparisons, I’d say the tapa-covered spiral stairway of Trader Vic’s London may be more impressive, but Trader Vic’s Munich has the edge when it comes to the rest of the decor.)

Reception

Here, you’ll be greeted by more tall tikis and the reception stand. Straight ahead is the bar and lounge area, while the various dining rooms are to the right.

Bar

On a future visit, I’d try to snag one of the small tables in the bar area, since it’s in the middle of the action. It was a bit confusing to figure out where the lounge seating technically stops, but we were told that anything without a tablecloth is up for grabs. (We checked back here later in the evening and the whole section was full, so I’d recommend arriving on the early side.)

Interior

The space is a labyrinth of interconnecting rooms and it can be difficult to get your bearings, especially if you’ve had a few Mai Tais. But who wouldn’t want to get lost in these gorgeous surroundings?

Dining area

The bamboo and woven matting ceilings are laden with glowing glass fish floats, outrigger canoes, pufferfish lamps and fish trap lanterns. Underneath this medley of textures and ambient lighting, diners are seated at rattan peacock chairs and green banquettes.

Chinese ovens

A glassed-in room houses the large wood-fired Chinese ovens, a signature of Trader Vic’s restaurants. A small sign describes (in German) that the temperature reaches nearly 500°C (around 900°F) and the oak imparts a subtle, smoky flavor to the meat that’s hung inside to cook.

Tableau

We were brought to a table in the farthest section of the restaurant, not too surprising since we hadn’t made reservations. (We had called earlier in the evening and were told it wasn’t necessary for that particular night.) Above our table there was a pretty little tableau of glass fish floats, shells and fake orchids and foliage. (Since we were in a semi-private alcove, I didn’t feel like I wasn’t making too much of a spectacle photographing the meal…)

Crab Rangoon

When you see the menu prices, you will remember you are in one of the fanciest hotels in Munich. Most of the main dishes are in the 30+ euro range, though there are a couple options for about 20 €. Of course, there are Trader Vic’s signatures like the cosmo tidbits platter, ham and cheese bings, bongo bongo soup, etc. Crab Rangoon (11,60 €) is one of my favorites so we had to start with that, especially since our German friend had never tried it before.

Barbecued duck

The menu seems much more extensive than what you’ll find at other remaining locations. (I noticed overlap from vintage menus from Trader Vic’s Beverly Hills.) It was a little overwhelming trying to decide on a main course from all the curries, continental fare (lobster Thermidor) and Chinese oven and wok specialties. I eventually settled on the barbecued duck breast with Polynesian spices, pineapple, mango chutney and Hawaiian potato gratin (30 €). (I don’t know what was supposed to be Hawaiian about it, but it was tasty.)

Wok-fried kangaroo

Our friend chose one of the chef’s specials, which was wok-fried kangaroo with ginger, prunes, shiitake mushrooms, sugar peas and scallions (24,50 €). He wanted to take the opportunity to try a more “exotic” meat than the pork that’s so plentiful in Germany.

Trader Vic's drinks

You’ll find all the classic Trader Vic’s cocktails, naturally, plus the Munich Sour. (The server told us it’s just like the London Sour, but with Cognac instead of Scotch.) I went for the Tiki Puka Puka (16,90 €), while our friend selected the Suffering Bastard (12,30 €) intrigued by the novelty of the name. The drinks were potent, to be sure, but could use a little more finesse. Thankfully, the fantastic setting helps one overlook any flaws.

Trader Vic's sign

If you’re traveling through Germany, be sure to take a momentary detour from the beer gardens and stop in for a Mai Tai at Trader Vic’s Munich. This treasure is like stepping into a tiki time capsule. It’s central and not far from the Marienplatz, Frauenkirche and other sightseeing attractions. As this menehune in the sign helpfully points out, Trader Vic’s is open every day from 5 p.m.-3 a.m.

Trader Vic’s Munich
Bayerischer Hof
Promenadepl. 2-6
80333 München, Germany


Related Posts:

Germany Tiki Tour, Part 1 – Kon Tiki

Germany Tiki Tour, Part 2 – Die Blume Von Hawaii